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FusE: Entity-Centric Data Fusion on Linked Data

Many current web pages include structured data which can directly be processed and used. Search engines, in particular, gather that structured data and provide question answering capabilities over the integrated data with an entity-centric presentation of the results. Due to the decentralized nature of the web, multiple structured data sources can... (more)

Layout Cross-Platform and Cross-Browser Incompatibilities Detection using Classification of DOM Elements

Web applications can be accessed through a variety of user agent configurations, in which the... (more)

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About TWEB

The journal Transactions on the Web (TWEB) publishes refereed articles reporting the results of research on Web content, applications, use, and related enabling technologies.

The scope of TWEB is described on the Call for Papers page. Authors are invited to submit original research papers for consideration by following the directions on the Author Guidelines page.

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Forthcoming Articles
Exploiting usage to predict instantaneous app popularity: Trend filters and retention rates

The popularity of mobile apps is traditionally measured by metrics such as the number of downloads, installations, or user ratings. A problem with these measures is that they reflect usage only indirectly. We propose to exploit actual app usage statistics. Indeed, retention rates, i.e., the number of days users continue to interact with an installed app have been suggested to predict successful app lifecycles. We conduct the first independent and large-scale study of retention rates and usage trends on a database of app-usage data from a community of 339,842 users and more than 213,667 apps. Our analysis shows that, on average, applications lose 65% of their users in the first week, while very popular applications (top 100) lose only 35%. It also reveals, however, that many applications have more complex usage behavior patterns due to seasonality, marketing, or other factors. To capture such effects, we develop a novel app-usage trend measure which provides instantaneous information about the popularity of an application. Our analysis shows that roughly 40% of all apps never gain more than a handful of users (Marginal apps). Less than 0.4% of the remaining 60% are constantly popular (Dominant apps), 1% have a quick drain of usage after an initial steep rise (Expired apps), and 7% continuously rise in popularity (Hot apps). From these, we can distinguish, for instance, trendsetters from copycat apps. We conclude by demonstrating that usage behavior trend information can be used to develop better mobile app recommendations.

Cashtag piggybacking: uncovering spam and bot activity in stock microblogs on Twitter

Microblogs are increasingly exploited for predicting prices and traded volumes of stocks in financial markets. However, it has been demonstrated that much of the content shared in microblogging platforms is created and publicized by bots and spammers. Yet, the presence (or lack thereof) and the impact of fake stock microblogs has never systematically been investigated before. Here, we study 9M tweets related to stocks of the 5 main financial markets in the US. By comparing tweets with financial data from Google Finance, we highlight important characteristics of Twitter stock microblogs. More importantly, we uncover a malicious practice ? referred to as cashtag piggybacking ? perpetrated by coordinated groups of bots and likely aimed at promoting low-value stocks by exploiting the popularity of high-value ones. Among the findings of our study is that as much as 71% of the authors of suspicious financial tweets are classified as bots by a state-of-the-art spambot detection algorithm. Furthermore, 37% of them were suspended by Twitter a few months after our investigation. Our results call for the adoption of spam and bot detection techniques in all studies and applications that exploit user-generated content for predicting the stock market.

Which Template Extractor Should I Use? A benchmarking & comparison for five template extractors

Web templates are one of the main development resources for website engineers. Templates allow them to increase productivity by plugging content into already formatted and prepared pagelets. Templates are also useful for the final user, because they provide uniformity and a common look and feel for all webpages. However, from the point of view of crawlers and indexers, templates are an important problem, because templates usually contain irrelevant information such as advertisements, menus, and banners. Processing and storing this information leads to a waste of resources (storage space, bandwidth, etc.). It has been measured that templates represent between 40% and 50% of data on the Web. Therefore, identifying templates is essential for indexing tasks. There exist many techniques and tools for template extraction but, unfortunately, it is not clear at all which template extractor should a user/system use, because they have never been compared, and because they present different (complementary) features such as precision, recall, and efficiency. In this work, we compare the most advanced template extractors. We implemented and evaluated 5 systems, 4 of the most advanced template extractors in the literature and a novel method for automatic template extraction proposed by us. To compare all of them, we implemented a workbench, where they have been integrated and evaluated. Thanks to this workbench, we can provide a fair empirical comparison of all methods using the same benchmarks, technology, implementation language, and evaluation criteria.

Polarization and Fake News: Early Warning of Potential Misinformation Targets

Users polarization and confirmation bias play a key role in misinformation spreading on online social media. Our aim is to use this information to determine in advance potential targets for hoaxes and fake news. In this paper, we introduce a general framework for promptly identifying polarizing content on social media and, thus, "predicting'' future fake news topics. We validate the performances of the proposed methodology on a massive Italian Facebook dataset, showing that we are able to identify topics that are susceptible to misinformation with 77% accuracy. Moreover, such information may be embedded as a new feature in an additional classifier able to recognize fake news with 91% accuracy. The novelty of our approach consists in taking into account a series of characteristics related to users behavior on online social media, making a first, important step towards the smoothing of polarization and the mitigation of misinformation phenomena.

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